Education

Education is the bedrock of every economy. It is the critical factor that separates developed, knowledge-based economies from developing, resource-based economies. Unfortunately, Africa has not fared well in building a robust system of knowledge transfer both in terms of access and quality. In Nigeria for instance, while efforts are being made through the Universal Basic Education Scheme to give access to children at the primary and secondary schools levels; prohibitive costs have continued to exclude many indigent but bright students from the benefits of higher education.

 

  • High illiterate adult population
  • Students cut corners to pass exams due to poor motivation to learn and lack of confidence in their abilities
  • Cost of university education is a barrier to entry for many low-income students
  • Poor students are more likely to drop out of school
  • Demands for a new workforce to meet the challenges of a global economy is rapidly increasing
  • Education, particularly basic literacy, is a powerful tool for promoting opportunity, inclusion, prosperity and growth
  • A university education improves quality of life and lifetime earning power
  • An effective reward system will motivate students to pursue self-directed academic excellence and compete fairly and strongly in the global economy
  • Senior secondary school students
  • Undergraduate students from low-income families
  • Rural adults at the fringes of communal life due to illiteracy
  • University education is accessible to disadvantaged students through scholarships, bursaries and other support programs
  • Students are confident of their abilities and are primed for academic excellence
  • Improved student achievement and life skills
  • Improved human capital in rural communities
  • Expanded economic opportunities in communities
  • To increase both access and quality of education in Nigeria, we have provided bursary support to deserving students, encouraged academic competition through our annual secondary schools quiz competitions, and continue to run 37 adult literacy centres. While our annual quiz competitions lasted, winning teams received automatic scholarship to study any course of their choice in higher institutions in addition to the open full higher education scholarship scheme. Our current priorities include:

    • To scale-up our existing education programmes, especially the adult literacy to accommodate more people and localities.
    • To combat under-nutrition-induced pupil absenteeism in the early child development and primary education levels through awareness creation and implementing a school-based feeding programme
    • To assess the impact of adult literacy on child nutrition in our environment
  • Achieving our priorities will directly contribute to the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals, SDGs (education is at the heart of all the Goals). It will also contribute directly to the Dakar Framework for Action on the Education for All, EFA Goals, especially Goal 6 which pays particular attention on improving all aspects of the quality of education.